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Process: User-Centered Design

UXmatters has published 59 articles on the topic User-Centered Design.

Top 3 Trending Articles on User-Centered Design

  1. The Value of Customer Journey Maps: A UX Designer’s Personal Journey

    September 7, 2011

    Until recently, I never saw the value in customer journey maps. In fact, throughout my career, I’ve even struggled with the value of personas and scenarios. Many times, stakeholders would just skim over them after our presentations or use them only to prove we were making progress on a project. Design teams, with the best intentions, made every effort to keep personas alive and breathing, only to succumb to other project pressures that demanded annotation, use cases, and itemized requirements.

    So why have I written an article on the value of customer journey maps? How did I manage to reach the conclusion that customer journey maps are not only a worthy and effective tool, but also a crucial element on large, enterprise user experience (UX) projects? Because I saw them have a significant impact on a recent project with The Boeing Company, and I’m now a believer.

    In this article, I’ll attempt to illustrate the virtues of customer journey maps, the necessary ingredients that make them an intelligent deliverable that encourages conversation and collaboration, and the role they can play in effecting real change in large organizations. Read More

  2. Best Practices for Designing Faceted Search Filters

    Search Matters

    Creating the ultimate finding experience

    A column by Greg Nudelman
    September 7, 2009

    Recently, Office Depot redesigned their search user interface, adding attribute-based filtering and creating a more dynamic, interactive user experience. Unfortunately, Office Depot’s interaction design misses some key points, making their new search user interface less usable and, therefore, less effective. That’s the bad news. The good news is that the Office Depot site presents us with an excellent case study for demonstrating some of the important best practices for designing filters for faceted search results, as follows:

    1. Decide on your filter value-selection paradigm—either drill-down or parallel selection.
    2. Provide an obvious and consistent way to undo filter selection.
    3. Always make all filters easily available.
    4. At every step in the search workflow, display only filter values that correspond to the available items, or inventory.
    5. Provide filter values that encompass all items, or the complete inventory.

    By following the attribute-based filtering design best practices this article describes, you can ensure your customers can take care of business without having to spend time struggling with your search user interface. Read More

  3. Hierarchical Task Analysis

    Innovating UX Practice

    Inspirations from software engineering

    A column by Peter Hornsby
    February 8, 2010

    As UX professionals, we have a great many analytical and descriptive tools available to us. In fact, there are so many that it can sometimes be difficult to decide which tool is most appropriate for a given task! Hierarchical task analysis (HTA) is an underused approach in user experience, but one you can easily apply when either modifying an existing design or creating a new design.

    This technique has applications across a range of different problem domains, including time-and-motion studies, personnel selection, or training, and provides a broad and deep understanding of task performance. While there are core principles that guide a hierarchical task analysis, it’s possible to adapt the basic approach in a huge number of ways to support the needs of any domain under consideration. In this column, I’ll examine one approach to hierarchical task analysis that enables UX designers to quickly understand both what a system does and how its capabilities translate into the system’s user experience. You can also use this approach to support the UX development process. Read More

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