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Column: Discovery

UXmatters has published 4 editions of the column Discovery.

Top 3 Trending Discovery Columns

  1. 7 Questions to Ask Users Early in the Product Lifecycle

    Discovery

    Insights from UX research

    A column by Michael Morgan
    March 20, 2018

    Whether you’re a UX designer, product stakeholder, or some other kind of curious-minded product professional, you need to know what makes your users tick. My new column Discovery: Insights from UX research is about unearthing what is already there—just waiting for a UX researcher to discover it.

    In Discovery, I’ll explore various approaches to gaining insights about your users by employing UX-research methods early in the product-development process. UX research can help you understand what would make your users’ lives easier.

    When you’re asking questions during user-research interviews, the key to getting answers that are not tainted by bias depends on what the question is and how you ask it. Taking the time and thought to pose constructive, reflective questions, ensures that participants can provide the information you need to portray an accurate picture of the customer narrative. Encourage participants to take the time to reflect on your questions and ask you for clarification when necessary. Read More

  2. The Power of Metaphor

    Discovery

    Insights from UX research

    A column by Michael Morgan
    January 21, 2019

    In Metaphors We Live By, George Lakoff writes that language is an important source of evidence about how people think and act in their everyday lives. The way we think, act, and communicate about everyday things in our lives is inherently metaphorical in nature.

    Because metaphor is a fundamental means of communicating with others, we should be able to use metaphors to construct coherent pictures of key research findings to help stakeholders understand and act on them. Perhaps we can even use metaphors to frame questions for our research studies as a more direct means of facilitating participant understanding.

    This edition of Discovery is about unleashing the power of metaphor. How can you leverage the value of metaphor when conducting early-phase product research? Read More

  3. UX Research: Using Sketches in Asking Questions

    Discovery

    Insights from UX research

    A column by Michael Morgan
    September 10, 2018

    Young children communicate well visually. When they want to articulate something for which they simply don’t have words, they point to objects in their environment. When they want more food and their plate is empty, they point to their empty plate or slam their plate down onto the table to signal hunger. They are prompting their parents to visualize what they are asking for. Their parents see the empty plate and know they’ve just finished eating their food. Their child must be asking for more food.

    Visuals are effective ways in which to communicate. Sometimes sketching is the fastest way to convey a need or ask a question. According to education professor John Hattie and cognitive psychologist Gregory Yates, people are not all just better visual learners or auditory learners. Lab studies show that people learn best when the stimuli they receive are from different types of media. Our brains are wired to integrate information in different modalities. When we want people to understand something that we are explaining to them, we can reinforce our meaning not just through words, but also through pictures and sounds. Read More

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