Top

Design: Web Site Design

UXmatters has published 52 articles on the topic Web Site Design.

Top 3 Trending Articles on Web Site Design

  1. Best Practices for Designing Faceted Search Filters

    Search Matters

    Creating the ultimate finding experience

    A column by Greg Nudelman
    September 7, 2009

    Recently, Office Depot redesigned their search user interface, adding attribute-based filtering and creating a more dynamic, interactive user experience. Unfortunately, Office Depot’s interaction design misses some key points, making their new search user interface less usable and, therefore, less effective. That’s the bad news. The good news is that the Office Depot site presents us with an excellent case study for demonstrating some of the important best practices for designing filters for faceted search results, as follows:

    1. Decide on your filter value-selection paradigm—either drill-down or parallel selection.
    2. Provide an obvious and consistent way to undo filter selection.
    3. Always make all filters easily available.
    4. At every step in the search workflow, display only filter values that correspond to the available items, or inventory.
    5. Provide filter values that encompass all items, or the complete inventory.

    By following the attribute-based filtering design best practices this article describes, you can ensure your customers can take care of business without having to spend time struggling with your search user interface. Read More

  2. The Purpose of Site Maps and Other Design Deliverables

    Ask UXmatters

    Get expert answers

    A column by Janet M. Six
    January 25, 2016

    In this edition of Ask UXmatters, our expert panel discusses the purpose of site maps. Web site design has come a long way since designers slapped a Site Map link at the bottom of every Web page to help users who were perplexed by a Web site’s organization—or has it? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Our experts cover exactly what constitutes a site map and how site maps differ from other UX design deliverables. They also consider the evolution of the term site map over the years, how site maps apply to increasingly responsive Web designs, and how agile development has impacted the use of site maps.

    Every month in Ask UXmatters, our panel of UX experts answers our readers’ questions about a broad range of user experience matters. To get answers to your own questions about UX strategy, design, user research, or any other topic of interest to UX professionals in an upcoming edition of Ask UXmatters, please send your questions to: [email protected]. Read More

  3. Paging, Scrolling, and Infinite Scroll

    Mobile Matters

    Designing for every screen

    A column by Steven Hoober
    November 5, 2018

    As I’ve noted many times before, people do not necessarily read left to right—and certainly, not in anything that is reliably like an F-pattern. However, once people find your content, they do reliably read it from top to bottom.

    Wrapping text to the next line, continuing line after line, and presenting lists of discrete items of information are the two safe, reliable ways of designing digital content, especially for small mobile devices.

    But what about when your content goes on and on? While there’s great concern about the right way of displaying arbitrary amounts of information, people make a lot of design decisions on the basis of hearsay, opinion, fear, or inertia. Plus, they assess existing design patterns based on incomplete data or bad implementations. Read More

Columns on Web Site Design

New on UXmatters