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Design: Information Architecture

UXmatters has published 55 articles on the topic Information Architecture.

Top 3 Trending Articles on Information Architecture

  1. The Importance of Information Architecture to UX Design

    May 4, 2020

    Information architecture (IA) is a key aspect of UX design that focuses on organizing information, structuring Web sites and mobile apps, and helping users navigate them to find and process the information they need. A well-designed, user-friendly information architecture ensures that users spend less time and effort searching for information and are successful in finding what they need. Key information-architecture tasks include identifying common features in content, forming groups of similar information objects, and linking documents to other documents on the same topic. Optimizing search for a Web site or mobile app also helps visitors to find information quickly.

    The knowledge that forms basis of a well-designed information architecture for a Web site or mobile app comprises the following:

    • the information needs of visitors
    • a site or app’s content
    • business goals and budget constraints

    In this article, I’ll describe some principles of information architecture, then look at the role of information architecture within the context of UX design. Read More

  2. Framing the Practice of Information Architecture

    Finding Our Way

    Navigating the practice of Information Architecture

    A column by Nathaniel Davis
    September 7, 2011

    “The practice of information architecture is the effort of organizing and relating information in a way that simplifies how people navigate and use information on the Web.”—DSIA Research Initiative

    Over the past two decades, the volatile evolution of Web applications and services has resulted in organizational uncertainty that has kept our understanding and framing of the information architect in constant flux. In the meantime, the reality of getting things done has resulted in a professional environment where the information architect is less important than the practitioner of information architecture (IA). Read More

  3. Comparing User Research Methods for Information Architecture

    Practical Usability

    Moving toward a more usable world

    A column by Jim Ross
    June 7, 2011

    In the old days, card sorting was simple. We used index cards, Post-it notes, spreadsheets, and buggy software—USort and EZCalc—to analyze the results, and we liked it! But this isn’t another article about how to do card sorting. Nowadays, there are multiple techniques and tools, both online and offline, for generative and evaluative user research for information architecture (IA), which provide greater insights on organizing and labeling information.

    In this column, I’ll summarize and compare the latest generative and evaluative methods for IA user research. The methods I’ll examine include open card sorting, Modified-Delphi card sorting, closed card sorting, reverse card sorting, card-based classification evaluation, tree testing, and testing information architecture with low-fidelity prototypes. I’ll cover the advantages and disadvantages to consider when choosing between these methods, when it makes sense to use each method, and describe an ideal combination of these methods. Read More

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