Top

Design: Principles

UXmatters has published 9 articles on the topic Principles.

Top 3 Trending Articles on Principles

  1. Fundamental Principles of Great UX Design | How to Deliver Great UX Design

    Ask UXmatters

    Get expert answers

    A column by Janet M. Six
    November 17, 2014

    In this edition of Ask UXmatters, our expert panel looks at the importance of considering the fundamental principles of great design—not just UX design principles, but design principles in general. Our panel also discusses how great UX design takes place within organizations, looking at this topic on many different levels. How can you create great designs when working with a variety of designers with different backgrounds and while working within the constraints of project-defined goals? How can the presence of User Experience at the C-level and, in general, garnering support from the C-level affect our ability to implement great designs. How can we produce great designs in a repeatable manner? Keep reading for the answers to all of these important questions. Read More

  2. Craigslist’s Unconventional User Experience

    Evolution of XD Principles

    Challenging XD conventions

    A column by Dashiel Neimark
    June 19, 2017

    I’m going to open my new column Evolution of XD Principles with a quotation that actually contradicts my position:

    “If you do it right, it will last forever.”—Massimo Vignelli

    He’s wrong. Massimo is a very well-known, well-respected Italian designer who has impressed the world by successfully innovating products in a variety of disparate product spaces. But he’s wrong.

    Design should always accomplish one key thing: demonstrate a thorough understanding of the people who will engage with a solution. A design should accommodate the well-defined mental model of those engaging with an experience. However, a challenge for UX designers is this: mental models represent collections of knowledge—and knowledge is never static. Forever is a fallacy.

    With this premise in mind, my goal for this column is to write a series of articles that challenge traditional experience-design principles in a way that explores next-generation—and forgotten, last-generation—experience-design strategies.

    Join me, as I explore such topics as why ugly products sometimes succeed, how some companies can dictate rather than accommodate usability patterns, and the hidden value of a user experience with a tinge of dishonesty. I’ll be leading you on a journey that will take us off the beaten path—one on which the only constant is change. Read More

  3. Principles Over Standards

    Innovating UX Practice

    Inspirations from software engineering

    A column by Peter Hornsby
    August 18, 2014

    “These are my principles; if you don’t like them, I have others.”—Groucho Marx

    For a long time, I’ve been an advocate of creating standards, guidelines, and patterns as a way of achieving design consistency within a large organization. While these do offer significant benefits, they also introduce a number of problems into the design process.

    Some Problems with Design Standards

    First, standards can provide a false sense of expertise in design. Calling something a standard, by its very nature, seems to imply that a great deal of research, thought, and experimentation has gone into its creation. It is likely that the proper stakeholders and experts have approved it. So designing something in a way that differs from a standard sets the designer against the people who set the standard and the weight of the work that they have done. No mean feat. Particularly for people who are new to an organization or junior designers, it can be easier to keep their head down and avoid challenging a safe option. In some organizations, particularly those that outsource a lot of design work, a reliance on standards can also lead to stakeholders using the standards to design solutions themselves, bypassing the UX design team. Read More

Sponsor Advertisement
Continue Reading…

Columns on Principles

New on UXmatters