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Design: Mobile UX Design

UXmatters has published 86 articles on the topic Mobile UX Design.

Top 3 Trending Articles on Mobile UX Design

  1. Designing Mobile Tables

    Mobile Matters

    Designing for every screen

    A column by Steven Hoober
    July 6, 2020

    Tables have an undeserved reputation for being evil and wrong in the digital environment.

    We’re now deeply into an era when developers code tabular data into Web pages using CSS tricks because the perceived overuse of tables for layout in Web 1.0 has resulted in a tables are bad mantra throughout the Web design and development world.

    But we should display tabular data in tables. Using tables properly, for the display of data, is a good and necessary thing. However, small-screen tables are an entirely different matter. Tables generally take up lots of space, and mobile devices do not have big screens. For years, I have set aside most discussions of mobile screen size in favor of discussing their use in hand and on the go and the extra capabilities that sensors and connectivity provide. But the data table is one case where the size of a mobile screen is absolutely the biggest problem, and the other capabilities of a mobile device provide no clever workarounds. Read More

  2. How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices?

    Mobile Matters

    Designing for every screen

    A column by Steven Hoober
    February 18, 2013

    Editor’s note: Since writing this column, Steven has done additional user research and has updated his design guidelines for mobile phones accordingly. Read his latest column on this topic: “Design for Fingers, Touch, and People, Part 1.”

    As UX professionals, we all pay a lot of attention to users’ needs. When designing for mobile devices, we’re aware that there are some additional things that we must consider—such as how the context in which users employ their devices changes their interactions or usage patterns. [1] However, some time ago, I noticed a gap in our understanding: How do people actually carry and hold their mobile devices? These devices are not like computers that sit on people’s tables or desks. Instead, people can use mobile devices when they’re standing, walking, riding a bus, or doing just about anything. Users have to hold a device in a way that lets them view its screen, while providing input.

    In the past year or so, there have been many discussions about how users hold their mobile devices—most notably Josh Clark’s. [2] But I suspect that some of what we’ve been reading may not be on track. First, we see a lot of assumptions—for example, that all people hold mobile devices with one hand because they’re the right size for that—well, at least the iPhone is. [3] Many of these discussions have assumed that people are all the same and do not adapt to different situations, which is not my experience in any area involving real people—much less with the unexpected ways in which people use mobile devices. Read More

  3. Mobile Apps: Native, Hybrid, and WebViews

    Mobile Matters

    Designing for every screen

    A column by Steven Hoober
    August 6, 2018

    I have a very expansive view of the role of User Experience in developing products. While I’m deeply of the opinion that designers should not code, that’s mostly because there are very few people who can code on many platforms and at many levels. I used to be a Web developer, database administrator (DBA), and system administrator. But I was never great at fulfilling all of these roles—much less all of them at once—while also being a Web designer.

    As new technologies arrived, I had to stop and learn them—or learn to collaborate with others who knew them. So, instead of learning more and more technologies, I decided to focus on design and usability.

    As UX designers, we should avoid becoming too deeply engaged in any one technology, but we do need to know a little about most technologies. This lets us consider the entire scope of users’ needs and suggest solutions that leverage the whole range of technology options—choosing whatever platforms, technologies, and methods best meet both users’ needs and organizational capabilities. Read More

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