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Column: Selling UX

UXmatters has published 39 editions of the column Selling UX.

Top 3 Trending Selling UX Columns

  1. Adopting a No-Left-Turn Approach to UX Design

    Selling UX

    A unique perspective on service UX

    A column by Baruch Sachs
    April 9, 2018

    Recently, in a customer workshop, I was listening to business users talking about the issues they were facing with their current system. This was not an academic exercise, as so many often can be, but rather a very interactive session with a highly engaged and enabled customer. My team had helped this customer with user research, design, and development for the application. Since the application had been in production for a few years, there was a ton of data about how people were really using it and how their usage could be expanded. The customer wanted to leverage that knowledge to make incremental design changes. While that sounds exactly like how things should work, anyone in the profession of designing and building user experiences knows that this was actually a rare opportunity—especially in the world of enterprise software.

    Even though they had identified a lot of tactical fixes to design and implement, one of the main strategic initiatives they brought up derived from the fact that users did not really know the most expeditious route to follow in completing their tasks. They also alluded to the concepts of speed and accuracy throughout the presentation of the application. Read More

  2. What Children Have Taught Me About Design

    Selling UX

    A unique perspective on service UX

    A column by Baruch Sachs
    October 8, 2018

    Recently, I conducted a design-thinking workshop. That, in and of itself, is no big deal; I do them all the time. I also teach others how to conduct and facilitate design thinking and quickly move to “design doing.” However, this workshop was different. I faced my toughest audience of all time—a group of individuals with such strong opinions. These folks were smart and insightful in ways I had never experienced before. They had strong personalities and were seemingly able to build and destroy at will. In short, this was my daughter’s kindergarten class.

    Her teachers invited me to come in and read a story to the class—and perhaps share something about what I did for a living. The reading part was easy. I could choose from hundreds of my daughter’s books or even buy a new one to read. The sharing part was much more difficult. I struggle telling adults about what I do for a living. How could I explain this to five and six year olds in the right way? Should I focus on the design part? The technology part? If design, I might come off as someone who draws cartoons—and I am terrible at drawing. If technology, I might be inundated with calls from parents asking me to fix their Wi-Fi or take a look at a malfunctioning computer. Read More

  3. Design Thinking and Digital Intent, Part 1

    Selling UX

    A unique perspective on service UX

    A column by Baruch Sachs
    June 25, 2018

    These days, it seems that everyone is all about design thinking—scrambling to jump on this runaway train and ride it for what it’s worth before the next big thing hits. There are design-thinking classes and certifications from premier management and technology consulting firms. However, UX professionals who focus on delivering amazing user experiences to people have always been design thinkers—for very good reason. After all, everything we do and experience in life is designed. From the applications we use, to the way we purchase a cup of coffee, design is everywhere. These things don’t just happen. Product teams don’t just write and execute requirements. Business analysts don’t just dream up these experiences. We design them by following design principles and business strategies. So, by employing the same design strategies to real business problems, we are bound to be able to come up with better solutions.

    Digital transformation is another popular term that describes the journey companies are undertaking today as they look to integrate digital technologies into every aspect of their business. These transformations consider people, process, organizational culture, the how, what, and why around the ways customers engage with their business. While every major company is engaging in digital transformation, their progress and maturity in this endeavor varies greatly. Throughout what are often multiyear transformation programs, they’re grappling with legacy processes, technology, and culture. As a result, many are still struggling to deliver tangible business outcomes. In fact, it is hard to find any company that will stand up and say, “Yes! We have reached the end of our digital-transformation journey, and we succeeded!” Why is that? Read More

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