UXnews

Publications :: Courtesy of InfoDesign

Content as the cement of the digital and physical human experience.

“Omnichannel is not a fad. It?s not some buzzword that replaces multichannel (although many people in the digital industry throw it around that way). Omnichannel also does not have to consider every existing channel out there or all channels (Latin definitions of omni aside). It?s not something to throw up ? no pun intended ? and display as something that is the be-all, end-all solution for all things within multichannel publishing. Omnichannel presents a model for placing the consumer at the center of a brand experience. In contrast, multichannel considers more than one channel. There may be a strategy behind multichannel, but in its essence, the term means more than one channel.”

(Kevin P. Nicols a.k.a. @kpnichols) ?

Compass and navigation on a trip to the wonderfull land of King Content.

“Content strategy for an entire organization and across all channels is super complex and very steeped in business management and operations. For the purposes of this book, I focus on the three main project types I?ve encountered most: function, property, and subset.”

(Meghan Casey ~ A List Apart) ?

There comes a time that web design will be part of art history. As a design movement in the early 21st century.

“Many of today?s most popular design trends are influenced by minimalism. This web design movement began in the early 2000s, but borrows its philosophy from earlier movements in the fields of fine art and human?computer interaction.”

(Kate Meyer ~ Nielsen Norman Group) ?

Getting the enterprise in focus for experience designers.

“There’s something strangely appealing about trying to make enterprise software not universally despised. I guess I believe in a utopian vision where enterprise software is useful, usable, and (gasp!) enjoyable.”

(Rian van der Merwe a.k.a. @rianvdm ~ A List Apart) ?

As a matter of exception, a tool item in an interesting context.

“There is an old adage that says ‘Use the right tool for the job’. However, with technology and User Experience Design, knowing which tools to use can be a bit nuanced. Often there are many tools for the job, all of which have their strengths and weakness. I?ve been thinking about a recently popular tool, Sketch, and where it fits into our practice of Enterprise UX Design.”

(Jaron Frasier a.k.a. @frason ~ Designmap) courtesy of @BaardAard ?

Everything has a future, some bright, some less.

“The future of user experience is growing rapidly and remains strong as designers, developers, and those who hire them realize that user experience is becoming just as important as the product or service in which they are promoting. User experience and its body of knowledge as a whole is being refined and redefined as we learn what works and doesn?t work and how to overall best serve the users in which we design for.”

(Amber Leigh Turner a.k.a. @amberlturner ~ The Next Web) ?

In God we trust, all others must bring data.

“When we think of analytics, we think of marketing campaigns and funnel optimization. Analytics can seem a little overwhelming, with so many charts and lots of new features. How can we use analytics for design insights? The best thing about analytics is that they can show us what people do on their own. The worst thing is that analytics don?t tell us much about context, motivations, and intent. Like any kind of data, there are limitations. But that doesn?t mean analytics aren?t useful. Working with analytics is about knowing where to look and learning which questions you can reasonably ask.”

(Pamela Pavliscak a.k.a. @paminthelab ~ UXmatters) ?

Get used to it.

“For many years, interacting with artificial intelligence has been the stuff of science fiction and academic projects, but as smart systems take over more and more responsibilities, replace jobs, and become involved with complex emotionally charged decisions, figuring out how to collaborate with these systems has become a pragmatic problem that needs pragmatic solutions. Machine learning and cognitive systems are now a major part many products people interact with every day, but to fully exploit the potential of artificial intelligence, people need much richer ways of communicating with the systems they use. The role of designers is to figure out how to build collaborative relationships between people and machines that help smart systems enhance human creativity and agency rather than simply replacing them.”

(Patrick Mankins a.k.a. @patrickmankins ~ FastCo Design) ?

I guess open source applications is the second category UX forgot, just like enterprise aqpplications. Crypto apps for example.

“Ultimately, that?s what makes UX in open source content management such a daunting task. The limitless, unpredictable variance in use cases, combined with an ever-increasing demand for multi-language, ?easy to understand? interfaces is difficult to keep up with.”

(Blake Callens a.k.a. @blakecallens ~ OpenSource.com) ?

UX design get more complicated. Design challenges for omni-channel, multi-device and cross-context.

“An excerpt from the new O’Reilly book, Designing Connected Products: UX design for the internet of things, explores considerations UXers need to be aware of.”

(Claire Rowland a.k.a. @clurr ~ UXmagazine) ?

InfoDesign by Peter J. Bogaards, Founder of BogieLand

Events :: Courtesy of the Interaction Design Foundation

Interaction Design Foundation